Sunday, February 22, 2015

8-20-1852: New-York Daily Tribune, Charles S. Little Ad; “Companies and Individuals fitting out for these markets can find a full and complete assortment of . . . Fire Arms, &c., &c.”

New-York Daily Tribune, Charles S. Little Ad; “Companies and Individuals fitting out for these markets can find a full and complete assortment of Miners’ Tools, Picks, Shovels, Hardware, Cutlery, Edge Tools, Fire Arms, &c., &c.”, Aug. 20, 1852

8-10-1852: “Self Protectors, To Travellers And House-Keepers.–The greatest Modern Improvement in Fire-Arms–Self-Cocking and Self-Revolving Pocket Pistols….”

The Daily Dispatch, S.S. Sutherland Ad; “Self Protectors, To Travellers And House-Keepers.–The greatest Modern Improvement in Fire-Arms–Self-Cocking and Self-Revolving Pocket Pistols….”, Aug. 10, 1852

7-24-1852: “A crazy man in Almant, Michigan . . . Two hundred of the citizens of the place resorted to the house with arms..."

The Caledonian, “A crazy man in Almant, Michigan . . . Two hundred of the citizens of the place resorted to the house with arms, fired it to drive out Hurlbert, and on his appearance shot him down.”, July 24, 1852

General Sir William Napier: "It is civilians, politicians, who make war, and that too, not for the honor of Moloch, but of Mammon", July 15, 1852


   One of the sentimentalities of the day, uttered in newspapers, as Peace Societies,–is that Military men are favorable to War, and therefore, not to be trusted. It is true, the people have almost uniformly decided in favor of Soldiers. But the idea remains with a good many people, who have good sense and are governed by good motives. It is singular, there should be doubt on the subject, when History can be appealed to for the origin of every War. In England and the United States nothing is more notorious, than that Military Men neither make Wars nor advise them, nor direct them, except only in the actual movements of the field. It is civilians, politicians, who make war, and that too, not for the honor of Moloch, but of Mammon;–
“—–The last erected spirit that fell,
From Heaven.—–”
   The quest[i]on was lately discussed in England by two men among the most competent in the world to discuss it and settle in favor of the Military Man. They were Samuel Gurney. Chairman of the Peace Society, and General Sir William Napier. The Times reported that Gurney, at a meeting of the Peace Society, in reference to the Caffre War, had said that it was a bad principle to have the Governor at the Cape, that there had been since 1837 “a constant reference to the Sword.”

   General Napier addressed a letter to Guerney, in which he stated, that at that very date, 1832, Sir George Napier become Governor of the Cape and for eight years peace and Christianity had been cultivated, the Colonial debt reduced, public schools founded, and every thing left in peace and prosperity. Napier concludes, as to the comparison of military men and commercial men, with this pointed question: “What manner of men be they who have supplied the Caffres with fire-arms and ammunition in their savage and deplorable wars? Assuredly they are not military.” Gurney, in reply, admits these facts; but says, Sir Geo. Napier is an exception, and appears to the present Caffre war; but says of military men–”Trained up as they are to the sword, they are far too liable to look to the sword for the settlement of international disputes.”

   This is a general proposition, and Napier sweeps it down at once by incontrovertible facts. He writes: “I say unto thee, that since the days of the Marlborough, military men have never had recourse at all to the sword for the settlement of international disputes, and it is not becoming to charge them with it as an offence. Mark, friend, political, and commercial men they are who have always find recourse to the sword.–He makes war, but he does not declare it. The political men declare war, and generally for commercial interests; but when the nation is thus embroiled with its neighbors, the soldiers save it from danger.”

   General Napier then significantly asks whether Greenville, who made the Stamp act and the war with America, was a miltary man? Whether Pitt who made the long war with France, was a military man? Whether the East India Company, who conquered India, were military men? Was Warren Hastings or Lord Wellesly military men? Was it military men who made the Affghan war? the Punjaub war? and a war to force opium on China? And was it military men who caused the African Slave Trade, with all its African war? We say that in the history of England and America, for the last hundred years, that question is settled. Military men have fought battles, but not made wars. We have just had a most signal example of this. Who made war with Mexloo? and who fought its battles?–Mr. Polk and his civil administration, not one of them military, made war with Mexico–while Scott, Taylor, and their fellow-patriots won the battles.

   Scott, the great military Captain of the country, is, perhaps, one of the most peaceful men in it, and who has, on more than one occasion, preserved the peace of the country when a very little indiscretion would have caused a war. Witness the Maine frontier when troops were marching on both sides–Seott, by availing himself of a personal friendship with the British Governor, prevented a collision and saved the administration from its difficulties.

   So on the Niagara Frontier, when the slightest outbreak would have made war, he moved about, the minister of peace. And so in Mexico–he is at this moment charged, as a crime, with waiting and listening to the overtures of peace. Peace was the object of his movements, and he resorted to battle only when negotiation failed.

   It is a little singular that an idea as plausible, and so caught at by many people should be so peremptorily negatived by actual history as that military men are disposed to make war, for wars sake. Young men may, and do desire the glory of victorious battle, but young men do not command even regiments, and experienced military men do not desire war. Why should they?

[Glasgow Weekly Times, City Of Glasgow [MO.], Thursday Morning, July 15, 1852. Vol. 13. No. 20. Pg. 1]

7-2-1852: “Sec. 4 That it shall be unlawful for any person to shoot or discharge a load from any gun, pistol, or other fire arms . . . any person so offending, shall . . . pay a fine of not less than twenty-five cents, nor more than one dollar.”

Town of Beallsville [Ohio], “Sec. 4 That it shall be unlawful for any person to shoot or discharge a load from any gun, pistol, or other fire arms . . . any person so offending, shall, upon conviction thereof, pay a fine of not less than twenty-five cents, nor more than one dollar.”, July 2, 1852

11-14-1850: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Levi Woodbury, “How does the question stand on the principles of our bill of rights? . . . You hold out the husk, but withdraw the kernel. You allow fire-arms, but neither gunpowder nor lead to load them and make them effective.”

Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Levi Woodbury, “How does the question stand on the principles of our bill of rights? . . . Why not, then, let them aid in legislating to protect all these? You hold out the husk, but withdraw the kernel. You allow fire-arms, but neither gunpowder nor lead to load them and make them effective.”, Nov. 14, 1850

Saturday, February 21, 2015

6-7-1852: “The population also muster all their fire-arms, and unite with the military to “shoot the devil.” We hope they may hit him.”

New-York Daily Tribune, “The population also muster all their fire-arms, and unite with the military to “shoot the devil.” We hope they may hit him.”, June 7, 1852

6-29-1842: “Two gentlemen, who were riding near Woonsocket on Wednesday evening last, were stopped by eight men with muskets. They instantly drew their pistols..."

Jeffersonian Republican, “Two gentlemen, who were riding near Woonsocket on Wednesday evening last, were stopped by eight men with muskets. They instantly drew their pistols, and the scoundrels stepped back . . .”, June 29, 1842

5-4-1852: Just another example of how history has a way of repeating iteself....

New Orleans Daily Crescent, “Mexican Irruption–American Settlers driven from their Homes. . . . All the settlers on the river are arming themselves, and intend to be prepared for future emergencies if they should arise.”, May 4, 1852

4-29-1852: “Colt’s Pistols!! Just Received, a large invoice of the celebrated fire arms of all sizes and patterns . . . Silver Ware!”

Glasgow Weekly Times, Jno. Chamberlain Ad; “Colt’s Pistols!! Just Received, a large invoice of the celebrated fire arms of all sizes and patterns . . . Silver Ware!”, April 29, 1852

4-22-1852: Make Ready--Take Aim--Shoot!

Meigs County Telegraph, S. Garner Ad; “is prepared to fill orders for any kind of fire-arms–Rifle Guns, Shot Guns, Carbines, or even a ’76 musket for a[n]y body who wants to go Hungary. My guns are warranted to shoot straighter, farther and stronger than any others. . . . All he asks for them is money.”, April 22, 1852

Friday, February 20, 2015

1852: Public Acts Passed By the Mississippi Legislature, “To prohibit magistrates from issuing license to negroes to carry and use fire arms.”

Public Acts Passed By the Mississippi Legislature, “To prohibit magistrates from issuing license to negroes to carry and use fire arms.”, 1852

3-1-1852: “Every body in America is, in some degree, a soldier. Every body understands the use of fire-arms, and has been accustomed to handle them from childhood..."

The Daily Dispatch, “Every body in America is, in some degree, a soldier. Every body understands the use of fire-arms, and has been accustomed to handle them from childhood. There is scarcely any person who, in a country so full of forests and defiles as this is, could not render eminent services as a marksman. In this respect, we are unlike, and superior to, any nation on the face of the earth. . . . They are, themselves, the only enemy whom they have to dread.”, March 1, 1852

So much for the "sporting purpose" ruse....

   Here’s another “war arm” article similar to this previous post. Only this one has more “authority” behind it.

Legislature of Tennessee Committee: “The invention can be applied to any species of fire arm–either the pistol, shot gun or rifle . . . It will answer for a sporting gun, or for target shooting; and in battle it must necessarily be the most destructive fire arm ever used. It can be fired with certainty at least 40 times in a minute”, Feb. 21, 1852

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

4-22-1851: “it shall not be lawful for any person or persons to discharge, or cause to be discharged or use, any cannons, guns, or fire-arms of any description whatever, in or about Lafayette square"

Council of Municipality No. Two [New Orleans], “it shall not be lawful for any person or persons to discharge, or cause to be discharged or use, any cannons, guns, or fire-arms of any description whatever, in or about Lafayette square, under a penalty of twenty-five dollars for each offence”, April 22, 1851

4-22-1851: “Another Horse Thief Shot. . . . They got up at once, and took fire-arms with them..."

The Daily Crescent, “Another Horse Thief Shot. . . . They got up at once, and took fire-arms with them, suspecting that thieves were driving off their stock…”, April 22, 1851

3-26-1851: Laws Of Ohio, “Sec. 3. . . . shall be exempt from taxation . . . 18th. Each person in this State may be allowed to hold . . . all such fire-arms as are kept for the use of the owner”

Laws Of Ohio, “Sec. 3. All property described in this section, to the extent herein limited, shall be exempt from taxation . . . 18th. Each person in this State may be allowed to hold . . . all such fire-arms as are kept for the use of the owner”, March 26, 1851

2-13-1851: Laws Of Indiana, “Twenty-sixth, To prevent and punish the firing of guns, pistols or other fire-arms within said town.”

Laws Of Indiana, “Twenty-sixth, To prevent and punish the firing of guns, pistols or other fire-arms within said town.”, Feb. 13, 1851

Sunday, February 15, 2015

12-13-1850: N.C. Legislature - "Mr. Saunders stated that it was now discretionary with the County Courts to allow free negroes to use fire-arms”

North Carolina Legislative Proceedings, “Also, recommending the rejection of the bill to prevent free persons of color from owning or carrying fire arms; the bill was rejected. Mr. Saunders stated that it was now discretionary with the County Courts to allow free negroes to use fire-arms”, Dec. 13, 1850

11-28-1850: N.C Legislature - “Mr. Tripp a bill to prevent free persons of color from carrying fire arms”

North Carolina Legislative Proceedings, “Mr. Tripp a bill to prevent free persons of color from carrying fire arms”, Nov. 28, 1850

10-4-1850: “Mr. Albert S. Nipples advertises in another column, a new rifle . . . A specimen of this rifle has been left at our office for the examination of the curious in arms.”

Keowee Courier, “Mr. Albert S. Nipples advertises in another column, a new rifle . . . A specimen of this rifle has been left at our office for the examination of the curious in arms.”, Oct. 4, 1850

California 9-26-1850: “Citizens are called upon to defend the laws, and assemble in front of the City Hotel armed.”

The Mountain Sentinel, “Citizens are called upon to defend the laws, and assemble in front of the City Hotel armed.”, Sept. 26, 1850

8-14-1850: Senator Wm. M. Gwin; "who had muskets and small arms, and aided by a large number ready to assist them, all armed”

New-York Daily Tribune, “This morning they organized to the number of one or two hundred, who had muskets and small arms, and aided by a large number ready to assist them, all armed”, Aug. 14, 1850

Saturday, February 14, 2015

9-17-1850: New York Daily Tribune, Vivario Ploumdeur Ad; "...is prepared to receive and execute all orders for guns, pistols, &c., &c.”

New York Daily Tribune, Vivario Ploumdeur Ad; “Gunsmith To The King Of The Belgians . . . (sole agent in the United States for the sale of the celebrated Vivario Ploumdeur’s fire arms), is prepared to receive and execute all orders for guns, pistols, &c., &c.”, Sept. 17, 1850

7-4-1850: “Section 8. If any person shall discharge and fire off any hand gun, p[i]stol, or other fire arms . . . such person so offending, shall forfeit and pay the sum of fifty cents, for each and every offence.”

Councilmen of the Borough of Stroudsburg [PA.], “Section 8. If any person shall discharge and fire off any hand gun, p[i]stol, or other fire arms . . . within said Borough, for mischief, sport or diversion, except on the days of training and the Fourth of July, such person so offending, shall forfeit and pay the sum of fifty cents, for each and every offence.”, July 4, 1850

6-15-1850: "By game laws, the tax on fire arms, the English people are ignorant of the use of the latter; such ignorance being as remarkable as the general knowledge of their use in America."

   “The chief military authority of England, just before Louis Phillippe decamped, wrote a famous letter to prove that England was utterly exposed to French Invasion. That authority was right. England was exposed to dynamic aggressions. By game laws, the tax on fire arms, the English people are ignorant of the use of the latter; such ignorance being as remarkable as the general knowledge of their use in America. When Napoleon conquered the armies of a country he did not care for the peasantry, who were not used to fire arms.”–Europe By An American, No. XI. Paris Correspondence of The Tribune. Paris, Thursday, May 30, 1850. [New-York Daily Tribune, New-York, Saturday, June 15, 1850. Vol. X. . . . . . . No. 2860. Pg. 6]

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Oct. 1849: Philadelphia Riots/Riot in New York, ”Bowie knives, pistols, dirks, and about every other implement, offensive and defensive, was brought into active and bloody requisition.”

Philadelphia Riots/Riot in New York, “Several white men were also proved to have been active in the use of fire-arms”/”Bowie knives, pistols, dirks, and about every other implement, offensive and defensive, was brought into active and bloody requisition.”, Oct. 20, 1849

3-3-1849: "Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, “That any person . . . shall shoot or discharge any gun, or other fire-arm"

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, “That any person . . . shall shoot or discharge any gun, or other fire-arm, within the said limits, or at any object within the same shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor”, March 3, 1849

6-27-1849: Not About Slavery? Here’s the Final Nail in the coffin: Mississippi Resolutions...

Not About Slavery? Here’s the Final Nail in the coffin: Mississippi Resolutions; “or upon the passage by Congress by any law abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia, that we will join arms with Virginia and the other slaveholding States in resistance thereto.”, June 27, 1849

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

6-23-1849: Bloody Rencounter In Jail, “On Tuesday afternoon, a difficulty occurred in the county jail . . . He went to his room, procured a pistol . . . again went to his room, procured a double-barrel pistol…”

Bloody Rencounter In Jail, “On Tuesday afternoon, a difficulty occurred in the county jail . . . He went to his room, procured a pistol . . . again went to his room, procured a double-barrel pistol…”, June 23, 1849

4-5-1849: “That any person who shall wilfully . . . shoot or discharge any gun or other fire arms, or shall open any tomb or grave..."

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, “That any person who shall wilfully . . . shoot or discharge any gun or other fire arms, or shall open any tomb or grave within the same and clandestinely remove or attempt to remove any body or remains therefrom…”, April 5, 1849

6-27-1849: “Here fire-arms of every character—rifles, long guns and pistols—were brought into requisition...”

The Daily Crescent, “Here fire-arms of every character—rifles, long guns and pistols—were brought into requisition”, June 27, 1849

Supreme Hypocrisy: “The New York Democracy have fired 100 guns in honor of this victory. Let the other States yet to vote, fire not guns..."

Supreme Hypocrisy: “The New York Democracy have fired 100 guns in honor of this victory. Let the other States yet to vote, fire not guns, but democratic ballots”, May 23, 1849

Monday, February 09, 2015

It's high time....

   That We The People kick the grossly overgrown fat snout of our collective hired servants in the federal government back into its Constitutionally delegated position. These wannbe petty tyrants were hired, in part, to "SECURE the blessings of Liberty." Not to tell us what our liberties are, or when and where we can exercise them. Most of the States in the Union are worthy of the same treatment....

1-5-1849: "praying the passage of a law allowing free persons of color in said county to carry fire arms”

North Carolina House of Commons, “Mr. Griggs presented a memorial from sundry citizens of Currituck, praying the passage of a law allowing free persons of color in said county to carry fire arms”, Jan. 5, 184[9]

More communists move to America....

According to The Daily Crescent, New Orleans, Friday Morning, December 1, 1848. Volume I. . . . . . Number 233. Pg. 3:
    Icarian Colony .—We mentioned some weeks since that the French colonists who settled in the Cross Timbers last year, had become discouraged and were about to return to France. It appears, however, that another colony, with more ample means, and of superior numbers, is soon to succeed them. It is stated that the third pioneer division of the Icarian Colony, under the guidance of M. Mazet, has started from Havre for the colony in Texas. The next division was to follow them in October. This company will be under the direction of M. Pepin. The colonists are well supplied with fire arms, provisions, etc., and will take with them a quantity of grain, garden seeds and agricultural implements. They will also bring some choice shepherd dogs. We infer from this that they intend to engage in the raising of sheep.
   [More like they intended to make American citizens "sheep".]

Also see:

1-3-1849: Warning of Civil War more than ten years prior to secession...

Warning of Civil War more than ten years prior to secession, “The South prefer a seperation of the Union to accepting the Wilmot Proviso . . . Hail Columby! who’s afeard? Fotch on your bagonets. The South has difficulty enough without pointing her fire-arms this way.”, Jan. 3 1849

Sunday, February 08, 2015

I've been rioting on the railroad....

The Daily Crescent, Riot On The Cheshire [N.H.] Railroad, “and fire-arms were freely used . . . dispelled the rioters, after one discharge of musketry”, Aug. 16, 1848

   And it goes like this:   
I've been rioting on the railroad
All the live-long day.
I've been rioting on the railroad
Just to pass the time away.
Can't you hear the pistols blowing,
Rise up so early in the morn;
Can't you hear the captain shouting,
"Dinah, blow your horn!"
Dinah, won't you blow,
Dinah, won't you blow,
Dinah, won't you blow your horn?
Dinah, won't you blow,
Dinah, won't you blow,
Dinah, won't you blow your horn?
Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah
Someone's in the kitchen I know
Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah
Strummin' on the old banjo!
Singin' fee, fie, fiddly-i-o
Fee, fie, fiddly-i-o-o-o-o
Fee, fie, fiddly-i-o
Strummin' on the old banjo. . . .

4-13-1848: “Slaves in the Dismal Swamp . . . A few weeks since, a company of them were discovered, and made resistance, as they were armed with pistols..."

Green-Mountain Freeman, “Slaves in the Dismal Swamp . . . A few weeks since, a company of them were discovered, and made resistance, as they were armed with pistols; they fired…”, April 13, 1848

10-25-1847: “Ordinance No. 8 “entitled an ordinance to define and prohibit certain nuisances, to prevent horse-racing, the discharging of fire-arms . . . passed March 14th, 1845, is hereby repealed.”, Oct. 25, 1847

Town of Louisiana [Mo.] Ordinances, “Ordinance No. 8 “entitled an ordinance to define and prohibit certain nuisances, to prevent horse-racing, the discharging of fire-arms, disorderly conduct and gaming, within the limits of said town of Louisiana,” passed March 14th, 1845, is hereby repealed.”, Oct. 25, 1847

7-17-1847: Before Justice of the Peace J.R. Dufrocq, “sentenced to receive one hundred lashes, 25 each day; also for stealing fire arms, three guns and a pistol from Mr. Petet”

Before Justice of the Peace J.R. Dufrocq, “sentenced to receive one hundred lashes, 25 each day; also for stealing fire arms, three guns and a pistol from Mr. Petet”, July 17, 1847

7-140-1847: A Baton Rouge attorney allows his young slave to "play" with a pistol, with not so good results....

The Baton Rouge Gazette, “A little negro boy belonging to Chas. Tessier Esq. was severely wounded in the hand from the explosion of a pistol with which he was allowed to amuse himself.”, July 10, 1847

1675: “This is believed to have been the origin of the custom of attending meetings with fire arms, which is well known to have prevailed extensively, if not universally during many years after this period.”

The Voice of Freedom, “This is believed to have been the origin of the custom of attending meetings with fire arms, which is well known to have prevailed extensively, if not universally during many years after this period.”, [1675-76]

Saturday, February 07, 2015

Believe this makes the point quite well....

Town Council of the Borough of Somerset, [PA.] Ordinance No. IV., "That if any person shoot off any gun, cannon, or other fire arms . . . such person shall pay a fine not exceeding five dollars, Provided nevertheless, that this shall not affect any Gunsmith resident in said borough, when trying or proving such fire arms, nor any Militia man or other military man”, June 1, 1847

1755: The "Rangers" formed by colonial citizens [NOT the Army] . . . .

Spirit of the Age, “all flew to arms to defend their fire-sides, their parents, their wives and babes from the horrid scalping-knife and tomahawk of the blood-thirsty savage. [The birth of the Rangers – 1755], March 25, 1847

3-5-1847: “Each person may hold exempt from taxation the following articles: . . . all fire arms kept for the use of the owner“

State of Ohio Amended Tax Law, “Each person may hold exempt from taxation the following articles: one man’s and one woman’s saddle and bridle;–one loom, not exceeding in value $10,–all fire arms kept for the use of the owner“, March 5, 1847

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

New York City: “A Mad Dog in Beekman St. . . . the gentleman who had armed himself with a pistol, now came up and shot…”

New York City: “A Mad Dog in Beekman St. . . . the gentleman who had armed himself with a pistol, now came up and shot…”, Sept. 9, 1846

8-5-1846: “Your government is in the hands of tyrants and usurpers. They have abolished your State governments, they have overthrown your federal constitution . . . despoiled you of your arms"

Brev. Maj. Genl. Z[achery] Taylor, “Your government is in the hands of tyrants and usurpers. They have abolished your State governments, they have overthrown your federal constitution, they have deprived you of the right of suffrage, destroyed the liberty of the press, despoiled you of your arms, and reduced you to a state of absolute dependence upon the power of a military Dictator.”, Aug. 5, 1846

7-29-1846: "For the sake of humanity, it is to be hoped that the friends of law and order in our vicinity will repair to Nauvoo as soon as possible, bringing with them all the arms that can be collected...."

New-York Daily Tribune, “The Governor has plainly instructed the aggrieved to fight and kill off enough to put lynchers down . . . For the sake of humanity, it is to be hoped that the friends of law and order in our vicinity will repair to Nauvoo as soon as possible, bringing with them all the arms that can be collected. The police force are in want of muskets or rifles, and a loan of fire-arms of any kind will be thankfully acknowledged.”, July 29, 1846

6-25-1846: "in the meanwhile the citizens were arming, every manner of weapons being collected and put in order, even some of the women provided with guns.”

American Republican And Baltimore Daily Clipper, “the hostile approach of which was hourly expected by the citizens, who were fully prepared to receive the attack . . . in the meanwhile the citizens were arming, every manner of weapons being collected and put in order, even some of the women provided with guns.”, June 25, 1846

3-31-1846: “Head quarters Army of Occupation . . . strictly enjoins upon his command the most scrupulous regard for the rights of all persons . . . No person under any pretence whatever, will interfere in any manner with the civil rights and religious priviliges of the people”

Z. Taylor, Brig. General, [and very soon to be President]: “Head quarters Army of Occupation . . . strictly enjoins upon his command the most scrupulous regard for the rights of all persons . . . No person under any pretence whatever, will interfere in any manner with the civil rights and religious priviliges of the people”, March 31, 1846

Monday, February 02, 2015

3-24-1846: New-York Daily Tribune; “Gentlemen and families can obtain the full value for all kinds of superfluous effects they wish to dispose of, such as ladies’ and gentlemens’ wearing apparel, fire arms….”

New-York Daily Tribune, J. Levenstyn Ad; “Gentlemen and families can obtain the full value for all kinds of superfluous effects they wish to dispose of, such as ladies’ and gentlemens’ wearing apparel, fire arms….”, March 24, 1846

3-14-1846: “both side provided with fire arms . . . The application to the Legislature was to legalize the organization of a company of horse, which the citizens had raised for their own protection…”

The Baton Rouge Gazette, “both side provided with fire arms . . . The application to the Legislature was to legalize the organization of a company of horse, which the citizens had raised for their own protection…”, March 14, 1846

3-4-1846: “Discharging Fire Arms. Joshua Bigus, (colored,) charged with firing a pistol in the street . . . Justice Wright discharged him yesterday morning by paying a fine of $1 and costs.”

   Perhaps the following article should be clarified as to its significance. Maryland was a SLAVE state at that time.

American Republican And Baltimore Daily Clipper, “Discharging Fire Arms. Joshua Bigus, (colored,) charged with firing a pistol in the street . . . Justice Wright discharged him yesterday morning by paying a fine of $1 and costs.”, March 4, 1846

Proper regulation....

Vermont Senate, “Bill Introduced. By Mr. J. Barrett, authoring villages to regulate the discharge of fire arms in their limits”, Oct. 27, 1845

   Many of theses laws/regulations failed to include an exemption for the use of arms in Self-Defense. Although, I believe Vermont has always been a Constitutional carry state. So it must have been assumed in this instance....

Sunday, February 01, 2015

7-18-1845: “the main body of the citizens joined their companions; and, charging into the swamp, fired a volley on the runaways…”

Vermont PhÅ“nix, “the main body of the citizens joined their companions; and, charging into the swamp, fired a volley on the runaways…”, July 18, 1845

6-20-1845: “Milwaukie Riot.–The good people of Milwaukie have actually come to blows, or rather fire-arms . . . were armed with pistols and guns . . . cannons and guns are being fired. “

Burlington Free Press, “Milwaukie Riot.–The good people of Milwaukie have actually come to blows, or rather fire-arms . . . were armed with pistols and guns . . . While writing this article, cannons and guns are being fired. “, June 20, 1845

5-24-1845: “a colored boy named Richard Doyle . . . accidentally discharged a gun which he was carrying from the house…”

American Republican And Baltimore Daily Clipper, “a colored boy named Richard Doyle . . . accidentally discharged a gun which he was carrying from the house…”, May 24, 1845

4-26-1845: New-York Daily Tribune, Colt Ad; “Pistols at from $16 to $23 each in a case with equipments...."

New-York Daily Tribune, Colt Ad; “Pistols at from $16 to $23 each in a case with equipments. Great impositions are practiced upon the public in representing and selling the self-cocking and revolving six-barrel Pistol for Colt’s Repeating Pistol”, April 26, 1845

The [perverse] government shell game....

Guess which shell your rights are under!

God in All the States...

   ALL State Constitutions reference God, in one way or another, in their Constitutions. And the vast majority of them recognize Him right in their Preamble. Not a Christian country? Who do you frauds think you are fooling?